Thursday, July 2, 2015

Lawn Diseases Galore!


During the summer months, we often see lawn diseases popping up across the midwest. Lawn diseases are often a result of excess moisture, improper cultural practices (mowing too short, mowing in the early morning or when the lawn is wet), and more. While these diseases are far from aesthetically pleasing, they are rarely hazardous to the health of your turf, and will often fade over time once proper cultural practices are adopted.

We have selected 3 diseases that we will discuss after the jump! Click "read more" below to learn more!
Necrotic Ring is a soil-borne fungus fueled by poor soil drainage, improper mowing, and improper watering. Poor soil drainage can be caused by soil compaction - a frequent issue on sodded lawns. Symptoms include light green / straw colored ring(s), often with a patch of seemingly healthy grass in the center of the ring. This disease will often fade over time, but proper cultural practices should be adopted to accelerate the process.

Avoid overwatering, and have an annual aeration performed to help relieve soil compaction and drainage issues. Avoid fungicide applications; they are often impractical for homeowner lawns and neglect the root cause of the issue. If issues continue to persist, contact your lawn care company.
Red Thread is a fungal disease, often appearing on damp, slow-growing, nitrogen-deficient turfgrass (bluegrasses, bentgrass, fescues, bermudagrass, and perennial ryegrass). Red thread is often more severe in cooler climates, and plagues lawns with low soil fertility. Balancing proper watering habits with a fertilization program should alleviate this disease; there rarely a need for a fungicide application as the disease will fade over time once proper cultural are adopted.

Avoid overwatering, and have an annual aeration performed to help relieve soil compaction and drainage issues. Avoid fungicide applications; they are often impractical for homeowner lawns and neglect the root cause of the issue. If issues continue to persist, contact your lawn care company.

Leaf Spot is a fungal disease that thrives in cool, moist conditions - especially on lawns that are mowed too short. Leaf spot attacks the grass blades of your turf, resulting in small circular spots on the grass blades. These spots are generally purple / black in color with yellow centers - these lesions will fade over time once proper cultural practices have been adopted. 

Mow at the highest setting your lawn mower provides, while supplying your lawn with a minimum of 1.5 inches of water weekly to avoid instances of disease (adjusted for rainfall). Watering in the early morning is best, as it allows the lawn time to absorb moisture throughout the day - it will reduce the risk of excess water remaining on the lawn for long periods of time. Avoid mowing when the lawn is wet, or mowing in the late evening. 

Avoid overwatering, and have an annual aeration performed to help relieve soil compaction and drainage issues. Avoid fungicide applications; they are often impractical for homeowner lawns and neglect the root cause of the issue. If issues continue to persist, contact your lawn care company.

1 comment:

  1. Very helpful ideas for lawn diseases galore! I'm looking forward to reading your blog again. Garden Care Narre Warren South

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